April 2021 | Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence
Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence
April 2021

Monthly Archives

  • Summer Learning Programs Can Help Children Make Up Lost Ground

    With hopeful signs that the pandemic’s grip is loosening, we can start to focus on recovery and we have a lot of catching up to do. That’s especially the case with schoolchildren. Despite the heroic efforts of educators across the Commonwealth, many students lost ground over the past year. Far too many are struggling with lost instruction time, social isolation, hunger and mental health challenges. Now more than ever, we need to deliver innovative solutions that will accelerate students’ learning and recovery.
  • Ky. Postsecondary Moves Forward, Even in Pandemic

    The Council on Postsecondary Education’s 2021 Stronger By Degrees Progress Report http://cpe.ky.gov/data/reports/2021progressreport.pdf shows growth worth celebrating in overall educational attainment, KCTCS graduation rates, and STEM+H degrees, along with slower progress on bachelor graduation rates and a concerning decline in higher education enrollment. This year, that good news is especially impressive: results reported now include successes posted as a pandemic swept over the state, disrupting learning opportunities and demanding unprecedented teaching innovations.
  • Benjamin Gies hired to lead early childhood focus for the Prichard Committee

    April 14, 2021

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    For More Information Contact:
    Jessica Fletcher, Senior Director, Communications & External Affairs
    (cell) 859-539-0511
    jessica.fletcher@prichardcommittee.orgLEXINGTON, KY – The Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence has hired Benjamin Gies to lead its long-standing early childhood policy work and coalition, Strong Start KY, and to develop a new focus on helping communities design high-quality early childhood ecosystems. The…

  • SENIORS EXPECT A NEW LANDSCAPE OF CHALLENGES, CHANGE

    Over the past year, the Class of 2021 experienced stinging sacrifices, potentially life-changing insights and a range of hardships and new options they describe as certain to shape their entry into the adult world. As glimmers emerge promising a return to normal school operations after a year of remote learning, high school seniors look ahead with a new mindset of bracing for change and adaptation.
  • Time for Communities to Come to the Table

    As our children are heading back to school, the COVID-19 vaccine is become more available, and many of us are beginning to head back to our respective offices, our attention is rightly turning to recovery. For us at the Prichard Committee, that means education recovery. How do we take everything we’ve learned the last year, all the resources at our disposal, and all the creative capacity we can muster to stem the tide on learning loss, help our young people catch up, and accelerate learning to ensure we don’t have a lost generation?
  • What Does the American Rescue Plan Mean for Education in Kentucky?

    Kentucky is expected to receive an estimated $2.4 billion from the American Recovery Plan’s State Fiscal Recovery Fund.  This large pot of money can be used for a broad set of purposes including infrastructure necessary for our future success – like broadband (for which the General Assembly already dedicated $250 million).  Additional funds from the ARP will be distributed to cities and counties directly from the Local Fiscal Recovery Fund.  Kentucky counties are estimated to receive $1.15 billion with Kentucky cities receiving $751.5 million.
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